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Category Archives: Coach’s Corner

Justin Schwind is a human performance coach in the United States Military. A former football player himself, he started his career in the college football setting. After gaining over ten years of experience, primarily spent at the University of South Alabama, he transitioned into the military setting and worked with special operators and thousands of soldiers in the schoolhouse in Fort Bragg, NC.

Justin recently took a position as the Human Performance Advisor with the United States Air Force and the 58th Special Operations Wing. He will be overseeing many operations and coaches in order to enhance the overall performance and recovery of Air Force operators. He recently sat down with Perch to discuss his career, coaching philosophy, and how VBT is integral in the military setting. Huge thanks to Justin for his time and words of wisdom!

PERCH: TELL US ABOUT YOUR CAREER, HOW’D YOU GET YOUR START AND HOW’D YOU END UP IN THE MILITARY SETTING?

Justin Schwind: I played [football] through high school and walked on at Stephen F. Austin State University. I wanted to give back everything that was given to me because I knew from a motivational standpoint, to a work ethic, to character building, it was all instilled within sport.

So I transferred to Texas State University and started volunteering with football, and the strength coach said “hey man I need some help in the weight room” so I said “sure!” and started helping out and fell in love. I interviewed for a couple graduate assistant spots around the country, and ended up in a year long position at a neuroimaging lab at Baylor College of Medicine. We were filming exercises and then putting subjects into an MRI machine and seeing different parts of their brain light up from the motor cortex to prefrontal cortex. Basically watching the evolution of how everything relating to movement changed from a logic base to more instinctual.

Then I got a GA position at Mississippi State and was in the SEC, and that was the dream! Got my masters degree and went off to a DIII school and was the head strength coach at Birmingham Southern College and was able to be the guy for 21 sports. It was shock and awe.

From there, I headed down to the University of South Alabama and it was a start up program, I had no assistants but had 4 GAs. I was there there for about 10 years, we went from no real program to DI FBS, and it was fun! It was great to build that culture, I think the character of the person is important, you invest in each other and learn how to be vulnerable and creative, and try to take care of your staff. It was great. I went into administration for a year, thought that AD was the path I wanted to go, thinking I couldn’t be a strength coach forever in the college setting. That was the worst year we had in the 10 years I was there, so we all got let go and it came at a good time for me, my wife was pregnant and from a marriage standpoint, from being a father, I knew that this college game was not going to be my forever.

“I think the character of the person is important, you invest in each other and learn how to be vulnerable and creative, and try to take care of your staff.”

I had several former assistants who had been in the tactical setting, and I decided to give it a try. It’s pretty close to 40 hrs a week which is unheard of. I interviewed for a couple sports and asked my wife “where do you want to go” and she said “I want to move the farthest north I can” So I said “great, we’re going to Fort Bragg, North Carolina.” So I’ve been working with Special Operation Forces with SOCOM. And it was a stand up unit, they hadn’t had a strength coach for about 9 months. I spent the first month cleaning everything and shaking hands and getting to know people, and spending time getting to know the culture and the lifestyle of the soldier.

The schoolhouse which was right next door had an opening, the HP coordinator reached out to me and said do you want to come over? Where I was at I made all the calls and orders, but everyone in the SOF community has to go through the schoolhouse at some point in their career, so I said “sure, I’ll take it” knowing that it’d be a step forward in my career. I went from covering 700 soldiers to 5000 soldiers and got to join a strength staff.

My main focus was soft CCC, which is Captains Career Course, so anybody that’s an alpha or officer has to go through this career course after they pass selection. And where I’m currently at, I’ll take over the 58th SOW which is a rotary pilots program, and will also assist with the PJs. I’ll take over as the HP (Human Performance) advisor and really get to work with the culture piece.

PERCH: THERE ISN’T A LOT OF COMMON KNOWLEDGE ABOUT MILITARY STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING, CAN YOU SHED SOME LIGHT ON WHAT YOUR TRAINING LOOKS LIKE IN THE TACTICAL SETTING?

JS: Realistically it depends, but you don’t ever get to have a consistent year long training piece with a soldier. They’re always coming and going. If they’re off to some sort of school, or they get deployed, you have to get creative and get out of the box with how you’re going to communicate with them when they’re away and what is the best way to do it. I use Train Heroic, I think it’s awesome.

The second piece is that on base itself, you might be working with a soldier and they get a call and say “Hey in the next 48 hrs we’re going to the field” and so they go literally to a field and sleep on the ground and get beat to hell for 7 days and they get back and where do we go with training?

So you have to be able to adjust and adapt to that. And knowing that they might start back down at ground zero because they’re tired and broke and haven’t slept. They have been down field carrying things, setting stuff up, breaking stuff down, building things, shooting, whatever it is, you have to be able to adapt. We might do some sort of simple base assessment, throw a dowel on their back and do some squat jumps to see where they’re at from a velocity standpoint and look at that, and be able to load them accordingly.

“We might do some sort of simple base assessment, throw a dowel on their back and do some squat jumps to see where they’re at from a velocity standpoint and look at that, and be able to load them accordingly.”

PERCH: WHAT ABOUT THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SOLDIERS YOU’RE WORKING WITH, HOW DOES THAT VARY AND VARY YOUR TRAINING?

JS: What’s different about soldiers than the typical athlete is with an athlete, where you might have to take your boot and shove it up their butt to get them going. In this realm, you literally have to grab the reins like on a horse and pull them back. You have to talk to them about what recovery means, what detraining means, so they’re not overtraining or overreaching to a point where they can’t come back to a state of readiness. That’s where I’ve learned the most.

“You have to talk to them about what recovery means, what detraining means, so they’re not overtraining or overreaching to a point where they can’t come back to a state of readiness.”

You have some guys who are kicking down doors who are very physical. And some guys who sit in front of a computer for 12 hours a day, four days a week and then get three days off. So physicality, very minimal, but as far as stress through the eyes, nervous system stress, it’s taxing. They still need to recover even though they’re not the most physically gifted soldier in the world, they’re fried beyond belief. So working in mobility, working in recovery, working breathing, and the overall holistic approach to who they were to get them to a state of readiness.

Lastly, when you’re in the army you have to PT test once a year, so they have to get ready for it. The ability to prepare them for that, I’ve really enjoyed.

PERCH: YOU MENTIONED VELOCITY AS A READINESS ASSESSMENT. WHEN AND HOW ARE YOU USING VBT IN THE MILITARY SETTING?

JS: The military side, soldiers already know how to push hard, so we’re trying to teach them to understand what a true state of readiness is. Why do you warm up? To get you to a state of high output. If you’re not in a state of high output, it’s because you’re overtrained or under recovered. Meaning you’re probably not sleeping and probably not properly fueling your body. And we can then talk to our guys about what good looks like.

I’m going to have my guys when they come in do those dowel squat jumps and it’ll give me an understanding of what their state of readiness is for the day, because it can vary so much especially with these guys day to day. If they’re green, we know they’re fresh and we’ll go full bore. If they’re yellow, we’ll drop 10% or so from a relative intensity perspective and if they’re red we’ll go with mobility and try to get them recovered.

And then we also use velocity for fatigue. These guys know how to go go go go go, and they’ll think “unless I literally feel a burn and cannot move my legs anymore, I’m just going to keep going.” But using velocity, we can set those parameters and say “hey when you start hitting a .35m/s, you’re done” and they understand that. For soldiers, less of performance, and more injury mitigation. That’s a huge part. Injury mitigation.

“For soldiers, less of performance, and more injury mitigation. That’s a huge part. Injury mitigation.”

PERCH, SO WITH THAT IN MIND, WHAT ROLE DO YOU THINK DATA IN WILL PLAY IN THE WEIGHT ROOM SETTING, ESPECIALLY IN THE MILITARY?

JS: The big takeaways for data to look at and understand is:

  1. The Why. These guys love to know the whys, if they are a gun specialist, they will know the ins and outs of the gun. If they are a delta, they will know the ins and outs of keeping somebody alive. If they are a COM guy, they know the ins and outs of all the COM equipment. So when they train, the more they can understand the training more than just put a bar on your back and squat, the better and more efficient they’re going to train. I want them to know based off of velocity cut offs or zones what they’re training for. So it gives them knowledge, and it gives them the autoregulatory component. They can see when they get more output, the other factors in their life that may have helped account for it (they ate steak and potatoes instead of a greasy hamburger, they slept well etc) They’re able to get more output, and they communicate that with me.
  2. I’m able to regulate their program accordingly if I need to add a little more volume and say “your goal is to hit 30 total reps on this given day, compared to the 25 the week before” and if you can you can, and if you can’t you can’t but again it gives me more of a relative understanding of where they’re at and what they’re capable of from a volume standpoint, and also from an intensity standpoint too.
  3. If I’m working with a group or class of people and I want to make something competitive, damn skippy I’m going to use it to make something competitive! Every person who is in the military or college athletics loves competition. Why? Because it’s FUN! It has to be fun too, it can’t just be a dry day of “this is what you’re doing and this is all you do” so that piece that makes it competitive adds the purity of training. The velocity gives you those absolute definitive pieces because you can see that objective output on a screen. It gives you more attributes to pull from, more goals to set, I don’t think you can ever get too much of that. The coach has to keep it simple, but you can pick one attribute to try and train every day and the velocity based component of that gives you more opportunities to do that.

“So when they train, the more they can understand the training more than just put a bar on your back and squat, the better and more efficient they’re going to train.”

PERCH: DO YOU THINK MORE BASES AND MILITARY FACILITIES SHOULD BE IMPLEMENTING VBT?

JS: Oh dang skippy I do! But the education piece has to come. To my understanding there’s comparatively very little education on VBT out there. People are scared or stubborn in their ways and want to do what they’ve always done and so it’s just going to take time. Velocity Based Training is really not that old, so it’ll take a little longer for it to be less of a trend and more of a pillar of what we do.

PERCH: WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF THE INVESTMENT IN VBT

JS: From a VBT standpoint on the military side, let’s talk about dollars. Where people really see things is money, and if you can sell it from an injury mitigation standpoint, that’s where you sell the product. If I can implement VBT, [the soldiers] are going to be more proficient at what they do, be more optimal at what they do, and have less of a chance of hurting themselves, which means they’ll be more operational. It means they’re not sitting at home because they had an ACL tear and they can’t deploy. So I’ve invested over a million dollars in this soldier, and now he can’t go deploy because he tore his ACL because you overtrained him. So if you can corner that side of it, that’s how you’ll sell VBT in this setting.

“If I can implement VBT, [the soldiers] are going to be more proficient at what they do, be more optimal at what they do, and have less of a chance of hurting themselves, which means they’ll be more operational.”

The second piece of this is: by the end of their career, the soldier is still able to perform their duties at an optimal state too. So they’re 20 years in and they can still do it, they don’t get done and start making disability claims because they haven’t been hurt and aren’t necessitating additional medical care from the government. And this is why strength & conditioning is coming on like it is in this setting. Right now, in the army alone, we’re slotted to have an additional 3,000 strength coaches in the next 5 years. This allows college coaches who really believe in these applications to bring it to this setting and really enhance the overall performance of soldiers. So it’s coming on and it is here to stay, the more coaches learn to apply it the better our soldiers will be from an injury mitigation and operational standpoint.

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Spencer Arnold is a High School Director of Strength & Conditioning at Hebron Christian Academy, a private school in Dacula, Georgia. Additionally, Spencer spent many years as a competitive weightlifter and continues to coach Olympic Weightlifting on an international level, with two of his disciples recently qualified for the Tokyo Olympics.

Spencer spoke with Perch last week and told us what his journey through Strength & Conditioning was like, his coaching philosophy, his favorite periodization schemes, and how he integrates VBT in his various settings. Take a read through and be sure to check out his website and follow him on Instagram @SpencerGArnold @powerandgraceperformance and @hebronstrength!

PERCH: TELL US YOUR STORY, HOW’D YOU END UP WHERE YOU ARE TODAY?

SA: My story is way different than most. If you had asked me ten years ago if I’d be a high school strength coach, it never was the plan. In HS I was the athlete that did sports so I could have access to the weight room, not the other way around. I was much better at lifting weights than I was at playing sports, so I ended up picking up competitive weightlifting.

I graduated HS, went to the University of Georgia eventually and got my degree in religion and I’ll just be straight: I was a gym rat and I liked reading. Religion major made a whole lot of sense to me because you really only had to do work at midterm and finals, so I could go to the gym all I wanted and read these great books. I moved to Texas to get my masters in Theology, and all the while my competitive weightlifting career was going up. I started coaching underneath my own coaches, who were mentors to me throughout. As I got better at weightlifting, their coaching credentials got higher, so I lucked into this traveling internship of sorts. I just had great coaches and at the same time had a distinct interest in S&C.

I thought I was going to be a pastor if we’re being really honest. I was going to move back to Georgia, plant my own church and be a pastor that likes to workout. And that just didn’t work out at all. Every door that could’ve opened for me in the S&C world did. A Christian school in Georgia asked if I wanted to be a HS strength coach. It sounded like a good idea, and our family all lived in Georgia and we just had our first kid, so my wife and I moved back to Georgia. I started coaching at the high school and weightlifting and 3 or 4 people moved to Georgia to have me coach them and now 2 of them are going to the Olympics! I’ve just been really fortunate that this field is full of people who are willing to open their doors, take a guy like me under their wing, and let me ask 19 million questions.

I’ve just been really fortunate that this field is full of people who are willing to open their doors, take a guy like me under their wing, and let me ask 19 million questions.

Spencer Arnold

So, really long story to say, I thought I was going to be a pastor and now I’m a strength coach.

PERCH: THAT’S A GREAT STORY! WITH YOUR BACKGROUND INCLUDING GYM-RAT LIFE, COMPETITIVE WEIGHTLIFTING, AND HIGH SCHOOL STRENGTH & CONDITIONING, HOW HAS THAT SHAPED YOUR PHILOSOPHY ON PROGRAMMING AND PERIODIZATION?

SA: Everyone starts with a classic linear periodization pattern. I can’t even write weights for [the high school kids] because they outgrow them so fast. As we get into more advanced training ages, I move in a more undulating-type periodization. Inside of a week they have a pretty linear trajectory, but inside of a mesocycle you’ll undulate volume and intensity a little bit. Depending on the sport, I can undulate a volume drop into [major competitions]. If they’re really advanced, I’m going to do more block periodization with them, inside of 4 or 5 weeks they’re gonna get a touch of everything.

The competitive weightlifters I don’t do block so much. If they’re just starting out, linear still. At the end of their cycle I’ll undulate a bit. So we’ll go high intensity, drop back into lower intensity for a couple weeks, come back to high intensity depending on how many weeks the macrocycle is. And to be fair, it has a ton to do with the athlete and what they respond really well to, we just have to figure out what works really well for them.I’m a big undulating guy. It gives me the most freedom to give an athlete what they need most, and to adapt mesocycle to mesocycle based on what the athlete’s reaction to the stimulus is. It lets me be creative more than anything else.

PERCH: WHAT ABOUT FAVORITE LIFTS FOR YOU? TO DO AND TO TEACH?

SA: When I was competing I was a snatch specialist which basically just means I was weak and couldn’t clean and jerk. No one outright told me that but my legs were too weak and I was too tall, that’s pretty much what that meant. In Olympic Weightlifting I love – I’m much more apt to teach the Jerk. Being good at the jerk makes you dangerous. In high school, we’re an olympic based program, obviously I like the clean. I’m a big fan of snatching on gameday, I think it’s a great stimulus for the central nervous system. It’s a primer, my football guys are sitting all day and from a mobility perspective, I can get everything from the ankle to the shoulder in a snatch. It’s an easy way to get some strength-speed work in and have zero negative impact on their performance on the field that evening and get some mobility work in it.

PERCH: YOU GAVE US THAT STRENGTH-SPEED BUZZWORD. TALK TO US ABOUT HOW YOU LEARNED ABOUT VBT AND STARTED USING IT?

SA: I heard about it in 2013, so I was late to the game, and it’s because I missed it. I’ve read all the russian manuals, and I’ve read all of Louie’s writings. I just didn’t pay attention to that little “m/s” thing that showed up every now and then. I was so integrated into periodization models and accommodating resistance work that I didn’t pay attention to the speed stuff, at least not programatically.

I heard Bryan Mann speak at an NSCA coach’s conference and I remember being like “wait a minute” and it just clicked: No matter what I write, to some degree I’m writing velocity. If I write a certain workout, my intention in the back of my brain whether I know it or not, I’m writing it envisioning a certain speed. And then it was over, then I couldn’t get enough. Once it dawned on me that every bar moved at a certain speed and I didn’t have a clue what the speed of those bars were, and I had no clue what impact that had.

No matter what I write, to some degree I’m writing velocity…my intention in the back of my brain, I’m writing it envisioning a certain speed.

Spencer Arnold

And for me when I was weightlifting that was my problem, I could never get my bar to move as fast as my opponent’s. So then it was off to the races! I went and visited Ryan Horn at Wake Forest (he’s doing VBT with all of his basketball players). I remember going back and finding two parents whose sons would benefit from VBT and convinced them to buy the school at VBT unit and spent the summer just playing with it. Learning what velocity profiles looked like and it took about two years of experimenting before I got comfortable enough to apply it to my elite level weightlifters.

PERCH: WHAT IS YOUR PERSONAL PHILOSOPHY WHEN IT COMES TO VBT?

SA: Once I got into it and realized that every strength coach, whether they realize it or not, is a velocity strength coach. They are programming velocity whether they know it or not. That’s when I realized I would be a bad strength coach if I didn’t think about velocity more. I knew what those traits were and I was programming for those traits, but nobody could guarantee that they were getting what they were saying they were getting [without velocity measures].

Every strength coach, whether they realize it or not, is a velocity strength coach.

Spencer Arnold

Kids are lazy, they just are. So with APRE and RIR programming, I still couldn’t guarantee the autoregulation was happening. And that’s when velocity changed the game for me, because I could guarantee that I was autoregulating right. So one of the frustrations I always had for high school kids is they’re so hormonal. So you could have your star quarterback walking down to the weight room and he’s having the day of his life. He’s going to come in and crush it and have a great workout and then on the way down, he sees his girlfriend holding hands with somebody else, and all the sudden he’s going to have a bad day. So I had no way of guaranteeing the output I was designing, except for velocity.

And the kids love it, because it levels the playing field. I can take the 95 lb freshman in the corner, and he can compete against the 300lb senior lineman.

PERCH: SO WHERE DO YOU SEE THE FUTURE OF VBT GOING?

SA: Velocity is a big trend right now, but I think there’s a lot of people who are afraid to go all in on it. And that worries me because I don’t know why you wouldn’t. One of the more elite HS in our area uses VBT but won’t use it until a prerequisite level of strength is achieved. I’m not certain I know why they do that, and I’ve seen that in a lot of different programs and to some degree I understand that you need strength before working the speed side.

But shouldn’t you be able to guarantee that you are working absolute strength as a trait? And velocity is the way to do that. So my goal is to never have to write a weight on a sheet again, all I want to write is velocities. And I’m playing with how do I streamline Velocity/Load profiles for 195 athletes. I want to be able to give my athletes things that are more specific [to their level of strength] and Velocity/Load profiles are the way to do that. I plan on being at this school for 30 years, but my plan is in the next 5 years to have a program where kids never worry about how much weight they’re lifting, it’s about at what speed they’re lifting it.

But shouldn’t you be able to guarantee that you are working absolute strength as a trait? And velocity is the way to do that.

Spencer Arnold

PERCH: TO THAT END, DO YOU EVER THINK ABOUT “WHAT IF THE WAY WE’VE ALWAYS PROGRAMMED IS NOT THE MOST EFFICIENT?”

SA: Right, I just think: What if your undulating model has them deloading on a week and so you’ve got them hitting 75% for some doubles, but their system has them down that week already, and some of these studies show you can be 15-18% down on a given day. So now you’re no longer deloading them at 75%, you’re actually overloading them and then you’ve got them doing doubles at 90% and then the next week you’re expecting a peak? No you’re gonna get fatigue and no compensation and you’re gonna ruin 5 weeks of training. I guarantee that happens all the time all over the country. So my jam is just to make sure that never happens.

I love using it because I can work kids out on gameday. I can train them 4 or 5 days a week and I can guarantee it won’t negatively impact their performance with data.

PERCH: DO YOU THINK THAT’S ESPECIALLY TRUE IN THE HIGH SCHOOL SETTING? CAN YOU INCREASE THE FREQUENCY OF TRAINING WITH THOSE KIDS AND STILL GET GREATER OUTPUT?

SA: I think two things are more true in high school than in collegiate or professional and that is that: They need more development which means they need more frequency and training time Coaches out of fear of losing performance just don’t give them the reps or the training load they need out of fear of hurting performance

In HS, most of their initial growth is neuromuscular and you have more hormonal changes and variability at the HS level than you do anywhere else in life, and nobody is accounting for it. How many conferences have you been to where you’ve got a collegiate strength coach with his program on the board and HS coaches are trying to copy it down and apply it to their high school kid? That’s not even apples and oranges that’s giraffes and oranges!

In HS, most of their initial growth is neuromuscular and you have more hormonal changes and variability at the HS level than you do anywhere else in life, and nobody is accounting for it.

Spencer Arnold

Your 9th grade boy isn’t anything like your star wide receiver that’s running a 4.3. So I think the variability of a high school kid makes velocity even that much more important. If velocity belongs anywhere it belongs in high school in my opinion. As they get older and their training age increases and their frontal cortex develops they have more control over their bodies and they’re more aware of their bodies. Like “hey this is a bad day, I don’t feel right, I’m gonna back it down a little bit” whereas a 9th grader is not going to do that. He’s gonna look across the rack and see his training partner crushing it and he’s gonna go after it, he doesn’t have the maturity to know he should back it down.

PERCH: HOW CAN YOU MAKE VBT MORE ACCESSIBLE FROM A KNOWLEDGE AND EQUIPMENT PERSPECTIVE?

SA: It’s changing, but a lot of high school strength coaches are football coaches, so some of that has to change where they see strength & conditioning as a profession, not as a bi-product, so that’s step 1.

Step 2, is the software price point. I’m able to access it because I can go to a few donors, whereas the public school guys don’t necessarily have that. Where public school guys need to be educated is the grants that are out there if they title this under STEM. If they put this under STEM education as a technology inside their classroom and they start changing their language from meathead language into classroom language and start talking about differentiating assessment using STEM, that’s a goldmine for a county administrator, and they’ll find the money for you. They just need to be educated on what kind of proposal they need to produce.

If they put this under STEM education as a technology inside their classroom and they start changing their language from meathead language into classroom language and start talking about differentiating assessment using STEM, that’s a goldmine for a county administrator, and they’ll find the money for you.

Spencer Arnold

Step 3 is you have to have high school strength & conditioning become a profession that people choose. I think we’re getting better at it, there’s only like 2 or 3 states that are really doing it well. Georgia being one of them. The more that organizations like the NHSSCA get better at what they’re doing the more people will choose high school over college, ten years ago that wasn’t the truth, now there’s money and there’s jobs and we have S&C professionals coming to the high school realm.

PERCH: HOW DOES VELOCITY CREATE BUY-IN WITH HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES?

SA: Why velocity creates buy in with high school athletes is:

  1. It’s technology so they love it, they love that it’s a screen so it’s giving them a thumbs up or a thumbs down. I think it’s an easy buy-in for high school kids because they use technology all day long.
  2. Secondarily, it allows me as a strength coach to put everybody on an even playing field, and that makes the competitiveness a little more robust across the room.

So if I can toss all of that stuff on a flatscreen on the wall and the guy that’s normally killing everybody is all the sudden in third place, two things are going to happen:

  1. The guys that’s usually killing everybody is going to have to try a little harder where maybe he hasn’t had to try for a year.
  2. That little pipsqueak at the top of the leaderboard is going to get really really good. Because he’s finally winning at something and he doesn’t want to lose again.

So I think what it does is it creates a competitive environment where I can say hey the goal is to hit 80% of your max today at 0.5m/s and whoever is moving it the fastest is gonna be at the top of the leaderboard. Well 80% is 80%, it doesn’t matter if you’re a 300lb front squatter or a 100lb front squatter, but it’s gonna give a little bit of an edge to the kid whose squat is not as big. And it helps me as a strength coach with selecting exercises so it allows me to circle around the room to give wins and confidence to athletes regularly and consistently around the room rather than just the 2 or 3 that usually dominate. So that’s how we create buy in with that and we’ve already seen that. It’s a new way to challenge our athletes to be great and they love it.

PERCH: ANY LAST THOUGHTS?

SA: I do hope more high school guys get into this. It’s a way to transform the profession I think. It takes us out of the dark ages of meathead with mirrors and dumbbell curls and banging our heads against the wall, and brings us into the new age of being professionals.

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Keep checking back for more velocity based training content, tips, tricks, and tools. And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter , Instagram and Linkedin and like us on Facebook .