Velocity Based Training Research Review 5

If you are a new reader to this blog space, every few months we like to break down some of the best and/or most recent velocity based training research. Sometimes it is directly related to VBT, sometimes it is broadly related to strength & conditioning. Either way, we provide the citation, a brief synopsis of methods and results, and leave the rest up to you. This week we wanted to bring you two recently released research articles closely related to velocity based training. Without further ado, here is our 5th research review:

STUDY 1

COMPARISON OF INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP-BASED LOAD-VELOCITY PROFILING AS A MEANS TO DICTATE TRAINING LOAD OVER A 6-WEEK STRENGTH AND POWER INTERVENTION

Researchers Dorrell, Moore, and Gee recruited 19 trained male subjects (23.6 ± 3.7 years) and randomly assigned them to either the Individual Load Velocity Profile (ILVP) group or Group Load Velocity Profile (GLVP) group. The purpose of the study was to determine whether improvements in performance were greater in the individual load velocity profiles or group load velocity profiles. Subjects were all tested in the back squat one repetition maximum (1RM), load-velocity profiling (LVP), countermovement (CMJ), static-squat (SSJ) and standing broad (SBJ) jump tests before and after 6 weeks of resistance training. Upon retesting of all subjects, results indicated that jump performance significantly increased for the ILVP group (p < 0.01; CMJ: 6.6%; SSJ: 4.6%; SBJ: 6.7%), with only CMJ and SSJ improving for the GLVP group (p < 0.05; 4.3%). The back squat 1RM increased significantly for both the ILVP (p < 0.01; 9.7%) and GLVP groups (p < 0.01; 7.2%). While both interventions yielded positive results, researchers suggested the findings proved that the individualized approach may lead to greater improvements.

Dorrell, H. F., Moore, J. M., & Gee, T. I. (2020). Comparison of individual and group-based load-velocity profiling as a means to dictate training load over a 6-week strength and power intervention. Journal of Sports Sciences.

STUDY 2

GUIDELINES AND RESOURCES FOR PRESCRIBING LOAD USING VELOCITY BASED TRAINING. IUSCA JOURNAL

Researchers Moore & Dorrell utilized multitudes of existing research to develop guidelines for prescribing load through the use of velocity based training. When prescribing load, coaches often have no means of taking velocity into account, and adapting training loads for the varying fluctuations in physiological conditions athletes can be in day to day. The researchers developed an app that can assist in prescription (linked below). While this was primarily a review of existing research, the investigators highlighted the importance of load/velocity profiles: “LVPs have been shown to remain unchanged despite significant increases in absolute strength and have therefore been theorised as a potential auto-regulatory approach for prescribing training load.” This research largely cited the first study we reviewed in this article.

Load/Velocity Calculator Here

Moore, J., & Dorrell, H. (2020). Guidelines and Resources for Prescribing Load using Velocity Based Training. IUSCA Journal, 1(1). Retrieved from http://journal.iusca.org/index.php/Journal/article/view/4

Also check out our Perch post on Understanding Force/Velocity Profiles

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